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I See Now That What We Did to Hawaii Was Wrong

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by Knowshon Moreno
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First, you should probably read this, via this.
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The night of the Sugar Bowl approximately 8 o’clock I received a handoff in my hands so I proceeded to run for a touchdown as usual. When I got to the end zone, a safety was cussing me and I asked him what the problem was. He said the beating was too hard and asked us to turn it down, so I went back to the sidline and my coaches and I willingly kept myself out of the end zone the rest of the night. After the middle of the third quarter, some other starters and I left the game so we could make sure there would not be anymore humiliations to their big game.

Approximately three hours later we received notice outside a club on Royale Street saying we had violated Hawaii’s dream season with an excessive blowout. We were confused by this notice because this event took place on a football field which is where it’s all right to be knocking heads. My teammates and I are very aware of this. It did not seem as if we were being dominant enough that people could cuss us or fear us on the other sideline; we were merely expressing our excitement to be playing in a big game that night, but not to the point where we making crying in the people around us.

A few of the harmful effects of exposure to Knowshon Moreno and his teammates.
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After taking time to listen about the harmful effects of excessively beating an undefeated team, it was lame and a waste of time, yet educational. It was little ridiculous to stand outside da club and listen about how bad we made Hawaii feel because it is common sense only winners feel good, but I continued to listen about their self-esteem. Self-esteem is considered as an overall self-appraisal of their own worth. This is obviously a correct statement because the Hawaii people did not feel very worthy that night because of my touchdowns. My touchdowns occur continuously throughout everyday and disrupt many people at all costs, like Auburn and Florida. On a more serious note, out excessive blowouts had been tested, and shown to affect the central nervous, immune, cardiovascular and championship selection systems. The disruption of these systems can cause many negative outcomes. Even while undefeated, sudden blowouts can cause stress reactions to the whole body. Being exposed to blowouts over a period of time can lead to certain coaches getting fired or resigning, which I was most shocked by.

In conclusion, I learned a lot about excessive blowouts and their effects on others around me. To show the responsibility that I had gained over this situation I was asked outside da club if I could beat the living dog crap out of the Hawaii clowns talking noise. My answer to this was yes because I can, but I kindly stated that I would not be able to perform this act at the time because I did not want to further disturb someone whose self-esteem I had already severely damaged. If I had the chance to experience this whole situation again I would have kept myself out of the game after the first quarter and inform my teammates to keep the beating down. I put much though into my actions and I discovered that if I was beaten by several touchdowns I would be upset too, especially if I barely got the ball. Overall, the moral of the circumstances that took place in the Superdome one past New Year’s Eve is, beat others as you would like to be beaten. I am sorry for ruining a smaller program’s once-in-a-lifetime season and therefore I’ll be facing a much better team in the BCS next year.